May Sarton’s Death – Age, Place, Cause, and More!

May Sarton died at age 83, impressive. Check out the death cause, death date, and more facts about the circumstances surrounding non-fiction author May Sarton's death.

Biography - A Short Wiki

A Belgian-American novelist, poet, and memoirist, she is best known for such non-fiction works as Plant Dreaming Deep and Journal of a Solitude. Her novels include Shadow of a Man and Faithful are the Wounds; some of her most notable poetry collections are Halfway to Silence and A Durable Fire.

She attended Cambridge High and Latin School in Massachusetts during the 1920s. As a teenager, she took theater classes but spent the majority of her time writing poetry.

Her first poetry collection, Encounter in April, was published in 1937.

How did May Sarton die?

May Sarton's death was caused by breast cancer.

YORK, Maine — May Sarton, 83, a prolific feminist poet and novelist whose life and work reflected strength and stoicism, died of breast cancer July 16 at a hospital here. She began her writing career as a poet, starting with sonnets published in Poetry magazine in 1929.

Information about the death of May Sarton
Cause of deathBreast Cancer
Age of death83 years
ProfessionNon-Fiction Author
BirthdayMay 3, 1912
Death dateJuly 16, 1995
Place of deathYork, Maine, United States
Place of burialN/A

Quotes

"It is the privilege of those who fear love to murder those who do not fear it!"

May SartonMay Sarton

"May we agree that private life is irrelevant? Multiple, mixed, ambiguous at best - out of it we try to fashion the crystal clear, the singular, the absolute, and that is what is relevant; that is what matters."

May SartonMay Sarton

"In a total work, the failures have their not unimportant place."

May SartonMay Sarton

"Help us to be ever faithful gardeners of the spirit, who know that without darkness nothing comes to birth, and without light nothing flowers."

May SartonMay Sarton

"The garden is growth and change and that means loss as well as constant new treasures to make up for a few disasters."

May SartonMay Sarton